Hyde Road Added To Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project

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OK, so this particular bridge is fascinating to me. Not so much the story surrounding it because, to be honest, there’s not much to go on. But there’s clearly more to this story than meets the eye…and the universe clearly wants the story told.

You see, as fate would have it, just before I was getting ready to publish the Hyde Road story, a blog reader, Lori Lotts, left a comment on the Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project home page. She asked about an alleged Crybaby Bridge on Jacoby Road, which I didn’t currently have listed. Long story short, through a series of messages between Lori and myself, it would appear that the Jacoby Road bridge was the original location of the Crybaby Bridge story. And when that bridge was demolished, the story migrated a few streets over to the Hyde Road bridge, where the current legend resides.

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Greely Chapel Road Added To Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project

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Long before my personal addiction to Kewpee hamburgers, my love affair with Lima, Ohio, began with the bridge on Greely Chapel Road. During my first trip out there around 2001, it was just another Crybaby Bridge. Of course, the more I dug, the stranger the stories surrounding this bridge got.

Several years later, I got involved with the annual Lima Lantern Tours and that’s when the stories really took off! Seems like everyone I spoke with during the Lantern Tours had a weird story to tell me about the bridge on Greely Chapel Bridge. There were so many stories that when the idea to create a database of all reported Crybaby Bridges in Ohio popped into my head, Greely Chapel Road was the first bridge I wrote down on my list of “must-haves”.

OK, enough reminiscing! Click here and enjoy a virtual visit to the latest edition to the Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project: Greely Chapel Road Crybaby Bridge.

If this is the first time you’ve stumbled upon my little Crybaby Project, swing on over to the Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project home page first to get caught up on what this whole thing’s about!

Gore Orphanage Road Added To Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project

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Ask anyone to compile a list of the most popular “haunted” locations in Ohio and Gore Orphanage will almost certainly appear near the top of that list. Not only is the legend of Gore Orphanage a popular one, but the stories associated with the location have continually changed over the years, making it incredibly hard to separate fact from fiction. So of course, it was only a matter of time before a Crybaby Bridge legend became associated with Gore Orphanage, right?

But where did the legend originate and can it be verified? Are there really ghostly children running amuck on this bridge? Well, what are you waiting for? Click here and check out the legend of Gore Orphanage Road’s Crybaby Bridge!

Of course, if you need to catch up on all the other Crybaby Bridges currently on file, or this is your first time here, you might want to visit the Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project home page first.

I Might Not Rock, But Some People Still Think I’m Cool

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Zak Bagans rocks!!!! You do not rock!
–anonymous e-mail I received after reviewing an episode of Ghost Adventures for The Ghosts of Ohio Newsletter

Over a decade ago, I bumped into a beautiful woman named Stephanie who, for reasons known only to her, decided to join me on my strange and spooky adventures (she also foolishly agreed to marry me, giving “strange and spooky adventures” a whole new meaning).

Looking back, we probably should have checked that Face Painter’s credentials BEFORE we agreed to be test subjects

I can still remember our first spooky excursion as if it were only yesterday: We decided to check out the ghostly legends associated with Cedar Hill Cemetery in Newark, Ohio. In fact, if you own a copy of Weird Ohio, turn to the Cedar Hill Cemetery story and you’ll see I even managed to capture that memorable day in photographs–that’s Steph with her ear to the door of the Baker mausoleum, listening for ghostly cries.

Not long after that day, Steph started uttering what has become something of a catch phrase of hers when we’re out on adventures: “I’ll wait here.” Usually, I’d hear these words if I pulled up to some spooky location in the middle of the night…in the middle of nowhere. But truth be told, my journey has taken me to some pretty sketchy locations that are spooky in broad daylight. And by that, I don’t mean that I’m trespassing or breaking any laws. It’s just that some of these places tend to be located in areas where, at any minute, you’d expect to hear banjo music off in the distance. Oh yeah, and there’s usually all sorts of broken glass, trash, and debris laying all over the place. In other words, a romantic setting this ain’t!

Of course, when our daughter, Courtney, was born back in 2010, Steph started saying “I’ll wait here” a lot more. And with good reason. Say what you will about me, but I’ve yet to entertain the thought of dragging my daughter through places filled with garbage, bugs, and god knows what else. So the two of them usually hang out in the car while I go roaming about.

“Come on, guys, it totally looks safe!”

Such was the case recently when I decided to visit the infamous Crybaby Bridge on Fudge Road. While I had visited the bridge many times in the past, I recently received an e-mail saying the bridge was in bad shape and was in danger of being knocked down. So I wanted to get some pictures of it for my Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project before it was gone for good.

As we drove to the bridge one afternoon, I filled Steph in on all the legends swirling around not only the bridge, but Fudge Road in general. Of course, there are just as many stories about people being chased down the road by angry neighbors as there are ghosts. Long story short, when people ask me about the bridge, I tell them it’s probably not a good place to visit. So it didn’t really surprise me that much when we pulled off to the side of the road in front of the Road Closed sign near the bridge and I heard “I’ll wait here.” Well, at least I heard it from Steph. Courtney was so engrossed in her Justice League Vs. Bizarro League DVD that I don’t think she even heard me get out of the car.

Fudge Road Crybaby Bridge

I guess I had been out of the car for 5 minutes or so, busily snapping pictures and even walking across the closed bridge, when I heard Steph call out “Jim?” My immediate thought was “oh s**t, someone’s here.” As soon as I looked towards the car and realized I couldn’t see it from where I was standing, I admit it: I panicked and started running towards Steph’s voice as I yelled back “coming! What is it?!” I was almost halfway across the bridge when I heard Steph’s response:

“We’re getting out. Courtney said she wants to see your spooky bridge.”

And see it she did. For the next few minutes, Courtney wandered along Fudge Road and the Crybaby Bridge, sometimes hand-in-hand with Steph, asking questions about ghosts and bridges…and hawks (she saw one in the trees). She even made me and Steph pose for a picture on the bridge. All the while, I kept trying to hide the tears in my eyes. Courtney still doesn’t comprehend that sometimes, people cry when they’re happy.

Photo courtesy of Courtney

So yeah, I don’t rock. But I have a wife who, after all these years, still loves and supports what I do. And I know she’s not even five yet, but my daughter still thinks I’m cool.

I can live with that.

Egypt Road Joins The Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project

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What better way to celebrate Friday the 13th than by adding a Crybaby Bridge that’s also supposed to be cursed? That would be the case with the infamous bridge in Salem, Ohio.

What’s more, this bridge is one of the few Crybaby Bridges where the stories of murder taking place here just might be true! OK, they are a bit exaggerated, but believe it or not, the body of a murdered woman was recovered right next to the bridge!

So give a click and read all about the latest edition to the Project: the Egypt Road Crybaby Bridge.

If you need to catch up on all the other Crybaby Bridges currently on file, or this is your first time here, click on over to the Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project home page.

Partial List Of Ohio Crybaby Bridges Released

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OK, so I know everyone is impatiently waiting for me to launch the Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project here. And it’s coming, I promise. But as I’ve started compiling the data, I’ve discovered something; nothing is right about these places! Directions are wrong, street names are wrong, and even the type of bridge is sometimes wrong (railroad trestle as opposed to a covered bridge, for example).

Now I know that since I’m dealing with urban legends and the Internet, I really shouldn’t be surprised that so much information is wrong, but I am!

Still, what I have so far is nothing short of amazing and soon, very soon, you will be able to visit this site and not only see a list of Ohio’s Crybaby Bridges, but also read the legend behind each one. Lots of pictures and even directions…although I’m wondering if it’s too early to start the obligatory “don’t trespass onto private property” messages yet. Perhaps I’ll wait.

Anyway, to thank you for your patience, I thought I would tease you just a little bit more by releasing a partial list of the Ohio Crybaby Bridges that will be part of the project. I’ve encountered more than a couple of bridges that were either gone or else the story was completely bogus. The following, however, will most certainly appear in the final version:

Abbeyville Road (Medina)
Alliance Crybaby Bridge (Stark)
Brubaker Road Covered Bridge (Preble)
Cable Train Trestle (Champaign)
Cleveland-Massillon Road (Summit)
Crybaby Bridge (Highland)
Crybaby Bridge (Shelby)
Crybaby Hill/Harris Jones Cemetery (Henry)
Crybaby Lane / Euler Road (Wood)
Crying Bridge (Richland)
Crying Bridge (Miami)
Crystal Springs Crybaby Bridge (Stark)
Egypt Road (Columbiana)
Fudge Road (Preble)
Ghormley Road (Highland)
Gore Orphanage Road (Lorain)
Greely Chapel Road (Allen)
Helltown (Summit)
Hyde Road (Greene)
LeFevre Road (Miami)
Mary Jane’s Bridge (Richland)
Myrtle Hill Road (Medina)
Newton Falls Covered Bridge (Trumbull)
Palmer Road (Mercer)
Pfeiffer Crybaby Bridge (Hardin)
Philo Crybaby Bridge (Muskingum)
Rogue’s Hollow (Wayne)
Screaming Bridge (Butler)
Schrader Road Crybaby Tunnel (Ross)
Stover Road (Thompson Road) Crybaby Bridge (Union)
Tindall Bridge (Sandusky)
Wisner Road (Lake)
 
So what do you think of the list so far? Have you been to any of these bridges in search of ghosts? Better yet, been to a bridge that’s not on this list? If the answer to either of those questions (or both of them) is “yes”, drop me a line at jim@strangeandspooky.com because I want to hear your story. Who knows? Your story might make it into the Ohio Crybaby Bridge Project, making you the envy of your family and friends!

 

Ever Been To A Crybaby Bridge In Ohio?

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Photo I took for Weird Ohio of the alleged Rogues Hollow Crybaby Bridge, circa 2004

You have? Then I want to talk to you!

I am currently in the process of compiling data for my Crybaby Bridge project, which will launch this summer on this very site. Basically, it will be a somewhat comprehensive list of all known Crybaby Bridges in the state of Ohio, including the legends attached to each bridge and what, if any, specific ritual you need to do in order to be able to hear the ghostly baby cry.

I will also be including photos of all of the bridges as I’m making it a point to personally visit each and every one, just to see if I can experience anything myself. And that’s where you can help! I want to know what happened when you went to the Crybaby Bridge. Did you hear the baby cry? Anything else weird happen? Or is the story just BS and absolutely nothing happened? Either way, I want to know!

Lick Road–a Crybaby Bridge in the making

Drop me a line at jim@strangeandspooky.com and tell me all about it. I’ll even include your story on this site because, after all, I’m a big fan of giving credit where credit is due. You don’t even have to use your real name if you don’t want to.

Right now, I have compiled information on 32 alleged Crybaby Bridges in Ohio, so chances are, the one you’ve visited is on my list. If that’s the case, I’ll have information that I can share with you about the bridge, too. See how that works? Everybody wins!

So come on and write me that e-mail!